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You might read that opening title and think, ‘is this person a dare devil or an adrenaline junkie?”

I am neither.

What is this about then? Other people who stare death in the face without realizing it.  The idea came from while I was driving to Jackson, TN for a weekend intensive conference (which is still ongoing, by the way), I watched as car after car after SUV after truck after eighteen wheelers (really!?) perform near miss as they weaved in and out of traffic. 

Let me tell you, the speed limit is 70 mph going along I-40 once you reach Madison County and I was going 80 (which wasn’t fast enough, apparently).  I’m driving and it just seemed like someone let loose some kind of toxic fog, because one minute I’m driving with the flow of traffic and suddenly people are on a mad spree barely missing other vehicles as they attempt to reach mach one in speed.

The scariest moment for me was when I was 15 miles outside of Jackson.  This black Mazda was speeding along pass me.  He barely (and I do mean barely) had room to merge to the Left lane without clipping the front of his vehicle and possibly ending in a disastrous out of control spiral.  

I’m thinking, this guy isn’t that crazy. He was. He sped up and cut in front of me, leaving one inch between himself and the back end of an eighteen wheeler. My heart dropped as I saw this. I couldn’t help think that if he had sped up a little too much he would have hit the eighteen wheeler and either swung into a ravine on his right, or into my car to his left possibly resulting in a pile up and a spot light on the 5′ o clock news.

Thankfully, none of the two happened.

So I suppose in a sense, I (consciously) stared death in the face, while they just kind of missed it as they swung passed his welcoming arms.

While I was reading a Japanese graphic novel, one of the character made  a comment that struck an philosophical nerve.

                       He said, “How easy it is for children to honestly express themselves.” 

He was brooding over his lack of ability to be honest with himself concerning his feelings about a young woman who he closely interacted with on a daily basis.  We might think that this type of problem is irrelevant to us as Americans, but I earnestly believe that every adult — young and old — reach a point in their life where they lose the ability to honestly express themselves concerning many factors  that make up the poetic motion of life. 

I am most certainly not completely and solely honest about all things in life and I have not yet met many who are…but like the character in the novel, I do believe that most children have the innate ability or rather innocence to verbally convey their feelings indecipherable as it may be — it is something to be valued.

These days, it seems as though values are steadily declining and honesty is becoming a distant fad.  This may not be prevalent in other cultures, but it’s a growing continuity in the U.S. 

Still I am optimistic. While many may not express themselves honestly — I feel that many of us still value the idea of honest, honor, truth — and that’s what matters. That’s what makes the difference.